Why you should demand fresh air in your office

February 23, 2017 Sanjana Saluja

A good ventilation strategy could lead to ripple effect that can reach far beyond energy savings to human health and robust financial return. Office Renew explores why tenant and building operators need to work together to develop an energy-efficient strategy. 

It's Tuesday afternoon in the office and you're feeling sluggish—again. Who do you blame? The sub you had for lunch, a poor night's sleep or the CO2 levels in your office?

It feels paranoid, right? And a tad dramatic to blame air quality for your lack of focus.

In fact, the "built environment," including and perhaps especially your office, affects your brain and body in ways you may not realize. We spend 90% of our time indoors and much of that in the workplace. Employees cost more than any other item on the balance sheet, and yet "indoor environmental quality and its impact on health and productivity are often an afterthought."

This is according to Joseph Allen, an assistant professor, researcher and lead author of a Harvard study that proved that the air we breathe in the office has a deep and profound impact on our ability to work well.

The study was conducted by the Harvard Center for Health and the Global Environment, and it made headlines when researchers found that higher levels of CO2 and VOCs* in the air led to lower cognitive scores.

Find out why tenants should start insisting on clauses that outline acceptable indoor air quality guidelines here.

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